WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE

INTRODUCTION

Clean water, basic toilets and good hygiene practices are essential for the survival and development of children in society. According to UNICEF, there are around 2.4 billion people who do not use improved sanitation, and 663 million who do not have access to improved water sources today.

The benefits of having access to an improved drinking water source can only be fully realized when there is also access to improved sanitation and adherence to good hygiene practices. Beyond the immediate, obvious advantages of people being hydrated and healthier, access to water, sanitation and hygiene – known collectively as WASH – has profound wider socio-economic impacts, particularly for children, women and girls.

The fact that WASH is the subject of dedicated targets within the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 6) is testament to its fundamental role in public health and therefore in the future of sustainable development. Indeed, access to safe water and sanitation are human rights, as recognized in 2010 by the United Nations General Assembly. For universal fulfilment of these rights to become reality, we will need the right systems: well-resourced, capable institutions delivering services and changing behaviour in resilient and appropriate ways.

What we are doing...

Poor access to improved water and sanitation in Nigeria remains a major contributing factor to high morbidity and mortality rates among children under 5yrs. The use of contaminated drinking water and poor sanitary conditions result in increased vulnerability to water-borne diseases, including diarrhoea facilities. Also, 23.5 percent of the population defecate in the open.  

Since inception, South Saharan Social Development Organisation (SSDO) has been conducting several assessments in a bid to better understand the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) burden of Nigeria and provide ways to alleviate it.

In August 2017, SSDO conducted a WASH feasibility assessment at New Gariki settlement in Enugu South LGA of Enugu State to assess the state of WASH in the settlement and possibly establish a Water and Sanitation system in the settlement.

In January 2019, SSDO assessed six (6) non-functional boreholes in Enugu State to assess the level of repairs needed.

In June 2019, Diageo – Guinness Plc engaged SSDO to rehabilitate eight (8) Water of Life (WOL) projects in three (3) state of the federation.

FACTS AND FIGURES

  • Today 1 in 3 people or 2.2 billion people around the world lack safe drinking water. (WHO/UNICEF 2019)
  • Over half of the global population or 4.2 billion people lack safe sanitation. (WHO/UNICEF 2019)
  • Approximately 50 litres of water per person per day are needed to ensure that most basic needs are met while keeping public health risks at a low level. (WHO, 2017)
  • 207 million people spent over 30 minutes per round trip to collect water from an improved source. (WHO/UNICEF 2019)
  • Globally, at least 2 billion people use a drinking water source contaminated with faeces. (WHO 2019)
  • Some 297 000 children under five who die annually from diarrhoeal diseases due to poor sanitation, poor hygiene, or unsafe drinking water. (WHO 2019)
  • 1 million deaths each year are associated with unclean births. Infections account for 26% of neonatal deaths and 11% of maternal mortality. (WHO/UNICEF 2019)
  • Hygiene promotion is the most cost effective health intervention. (World Bank 2016)
  • 2 out of 5 people or 3 billion people around the world lack basic handwashing facilties at home. (WHO/UNICEF 2019)
  • Loss of productivity to water- and sanitation-related diseases costs many countries up to 5% of GDP. (WHO 2012)
  • Universal access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation and hygiene would reduce the global disease burden by 10%. (WHO 2012)
  • In urban areas, for every $1 invested in basic drinking water, an average of more than $3 is returned in saved medical costs and increased productivity. For every $1 invested in basic sanitation, the return is $2.5. In rural areas, the return on investment is even higher: with every $1 invested in basic drinking water, an average of nearly $7 is returned in saved medical costs and increased productivity. And in the case of basic sanitation in rural areas, every $1 returns on average more than $5 in saved medical costs and increased productivity. (Hutton et al. 2015)

Photo Gallery of Borehole Projects

Noforija before rehabilitation

Ajegunle rehabilitation ongoing

Noforija after rehabilitation

Ajegunle after rehabilitation

Ilara before rehabilitation

Ajegbende before rehabilitation

Ilara after rehabilitation

Ajegbende after rehabilitation

Rafin Safin after rehabilitation